Monday, 6 February 2017

Accession Day

HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY ELIZABETH THE SECOND,  BY THE GRACE OF GOD, OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND, AND OF HER OTHER REALMS AND TERRITORIES QUEEN, HEAD OF THE COMMONWEALTH, DEFENDER OF THE FAITH, Sovereign of the Orders of the Garter, Thistle, St Patrick, Bath, St Michael and St George, Royal Victorian Order, and the British Empire

On the 6th February, 1952, Her Royal Highness The Princess Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh, learned that the life of her gravely ill father, GEORGE VI, had ebbed away and that she had acceded to the Throne.

On the 3rd February, 1952, the royal couple arrived at Sagana Hunting Lodge in Nyeri, in the foothills of Mount Kenya.

Their Royal Highnesses spent the night at Treetops Hotel; and it was here that Princess Elizabeth received the sad news of the death of her dearly beloved father, King George VI, on 6th February.

Royal gun salutes are customarily fired throughout the United Kingdom on Accession Day, including Hillsborough Castle, County Down.

2 comments :

Anonymous said...

I remember that February morning well. I was a pupil at Regent House Prep., then housed in the old school building in Regent Street. Ted Griffiths, the Vice-Principal, came into our classroom and told us of the King's passing. He announced that the School was closing, and that we were to make our way home quietly - no running, no shouting. A friend and I made our way to my father's business, and I think we were told to wait until lunchtime, when he would take us both home. I can't remember my feelings (i was only six, after all) but the unusualness (is that a word?) of the occasion has stuck with me all these years.

Anonymous said...

I was at Somerton House, aged 11 (strangely enough I showed the old building, now the NI Hospice,to my husband only yesterday - first time I'd been there in about 50 years) and we were told, possibly by the headmaster Mr Rawlings, about the King's death, and that we were to go home at once. I had not got a penny for the bus up the Antrim Road, so walked home to Lismoyne Park. I do agree about the unusualness (excellent word!) remaining with me. Different times!