Sunday, 26 June 2016

The Blackwood Baronets (1763)

THE BLACKWOOD BARONETCY, OF BALLYLEIDY, COUNTY DOWN, WAS CREATED IN 1763 FOR ROBERT BLACKWOOD

This family is of Scottish origin.

JOHN BLACKWOOD,
a gentleman of respectable lineage in Fife, removed to Ulster some time towards the middle of the 17th century, and, having acquired considerable property, settled in County Down.
Of the Scottish family of BLACKWOOD, the celebrated Adam Blackwood (1539-1613), privy counsellor to MARYQueen of Scots; and the said JOHN BLACKWOOD, of the same house, had his estate in County Down sequestered, in 1687, by King JAMES II's parliament, but was restored on the accession of WILLIAM III.
Faithfully and zealously attached to his unhappy mistress, this eminent person published, in 1587, his Martyrdom of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scotland.
John Blackwood was interred at Bangor Abbey and his grave-stone reads:
HERE LIES [JOHN] BLACKWOOD, MERCHANT, LATE PROVOST OF BANGOR, WHO DEPARTED THIS LYFE THE 22 OF MAY 1663 AND OF AGE 72. HERE LYES A MAN WHO LIV'D OF LATE INTO A FLOORISHING ESTATE YET WAS IT HIS GLORY THAT THERBY HIMSELF HE DID NOT MAGNIFY A SOBER IVST [Just] AND ..... MAN AND THOVGH HIS LIFE WAS BVT A SPAN YET IT SO BLAMELESS WAS THAT HE DESERVES A LASTING MEMORIE.
From this gentleman descended 

ROBERT BLACKWOOD (1694-1774), in the same county, who was created a baronet in 1763.

Sir Robert married firstly, in 1721,  Joyce, sister of Joseph, 1st Earl of Milltown, and had issue,

SIR JOHN BLACKWOOD,
 2nd Baronet (1721-99), who married, in 1751, Dorcas, eldest daughter and heiress of James Stevenson, of Killyleagh.

He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son,

SIR JAMES STEVENSON BLACKWOOD, 3rd Baronet (1755–1836), who inherited the peerage at the decease of his mother and succeeded as Baron Dufferin and Claneboye in 1807.

Sir Robert married firstly, in 1721, Joyce Leeson, sister of Joseph, 1st Earl of Milltown, and had,
JOHN, his heir;
Leeson, died unmarried, 1773;
Margaret, m to Stewart Banks.
He espoused secondly, Grace, only daughter of Isaac Macartney, by whom he had,
William;
Grace; 
Dorcas; Sarah; Elizabeth.
Sir Robert was succeeded at his decease by his eldest son,  

SIR JOHN BLACKWOOD MP (1721-99), 2nd Baronet, who wedded, in 1751, Dorcas, eldest daughter and heiress of James Stevenson, of Killyleagh, by whom he had issue,
ROBERT, died unmarried 1786;
JAMES, 2nd Baron Dufferin and Claneboye;
John, in holy orders;
HANS, 3rd Baron Dufferin and Claneboye;
Price;
Leeson;
Henry, created a baronet;
Anne; Sophia; Dorcas; Catherine.
Sir John died was succeeded by his second, but eldest surviving son,

SIR JAMES STEVENSON BLACKWOOD, 3rd Baronet (1755–1836), who inherited the peerage at the decease of his mother DORCAS, created Baroness Dufferin and Claneboye in 1800, with remainder to her ladyship's male issue by her deceased husband, Sir John Blackwood.

Sir James was MP for Killyleagh from 1788 till the Irish Parliament was abolished in 1801.

He was later MP for the Cornish constituency of Helston, 1807-12; and for Aldeburgh, Suffolk, 1812-18.

He then sat in the House of Lords as a Representative peer for Ireland, 1820-36.

Through his mother, Dorcas, Lady Dufferin, Sir James became the senior representative and heir general of James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Clanbrassil.

He succeeded her in 1808 as the Baron Dufferin and Claneboye.

Sir James was married on 15 November, 1801, to Anne Dorothea, only daughter of 1st Baron Oriel.

He died in 1836, and was succeeded by his brother Hans.

Lady Blackwood died in 1865, aged 93. They had no children. 

Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 5th Baron Dufferin and Claneboye and 6th Baronet (1826–1902) was created Earl of Dufferin in 1871 and further advanced to a marquessate, as Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, in 1888.

John Francis Blackwood, 11th Baron Dufferin and Claneboye (b 1944), is the 12th Blackwood Baronet of Ballyleidy, and the 8th Blackwood Baronet of the Navy.

The Blackwood Baronets' town residence was at 13 Cavendish Square, London.

First published in June, 2012.

Saturday, 25 June 2016

Glenart Castle

THE EARLS OF CARYSFORT WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY WICKLOW, WITH 16,674 ACRES

The family of PROBY, of antiquity and distinction, came originally from Wales, and were there named Ap-Probyn; though they flourished for many ages in Huntingdonshire.

RANDOLPH PROBY, of the city of Chester, settled at Brampton, Huntingdonshire, at the close of the 15th century, and by his wife, Alice Bernard, had two sons,
RALPH, of Brampton, dsp;
PETER, of whom we treat.
His surviving son,

SIR PETER PROBY, of Brampton, Huntingdonshire, and Swithin's Lane, London, served the office of Lord Mayor of London in 1622, and dying three years afterwards, left several children, of whom the eldest,

SIR HENEAGE PROBY (1600-67), Knight, of Elton, married Helen, daughter of Edward Allen, of Finchley, and had two sons.

Sir Heneage served the office of Sheriff of Buckinghamshire, and was MP for Agmondesham.

He was succeeded by his elder son,

SIR THOMAS PROBY (1632-89), who was created a baronet in 1662.

He married Frances, daughter of Sir Thomas Cotton Bt, of Connington, Huntingdonshire, and left an only surviving daughter, Alice, who wedded Thomas Wentworth, and was mother of Thomas, Marquess of Rockingham.

Sir Thomas dying thus without male issue, the baronetcy expired, but the estates devolved upon his brother,

JOHN PROBY, at whose decease, in 1710, those estates passed to the next male heir,

WILLIAM PROBY (elder son of Charles, third son of Sir Peter Proby), governor of Fort St George, Madras, who married Henrietta, daughter of Robert Cornwall, of Borrington, Herefordshire, by whom he had a daughter, Editha, the wife of Sir John Osborne Bt, of Newtown, County Tipperary, and an only son,

JOHN PROBY, of Elton Hall,  MP for Huntingdonshire, who espoused Jane, eldest daughter of John, 1st Baron Gower, and had by her,
JOHN, his successor;
William;
Thomas, killed at the attack of Fort Ticonderoga, 1756;
Charles, captain RN;
Baptist (Very Rev), Dean of Lichfield;
Caroline.
Mr Proby was succeeded by his eldest son, 

THE RT HON SIR JOHN PROBY KB (1720-72), MP for Huntingdonshire, and one of the Lords of the Admiralty in 1757, who was elevated to the Irish peerage as Baron Carysfort in 1752.

His lordship wedded, in 1750, Elizabeth, daughter of John, 2nd Viscount Allen, and co-heir of her brother John, 3rd Viscount, by whom he had issue,

JOHN JOSHUA, 2nd Baron, KP, who was created EARL OF CARYSFORT, in 1789.

This nobleman was appointed a Knight of the Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick in 1784

He espoused, in 1774, Elizabeth, only daughter of the Rt Hon Sir William Osborne Bt, of Newtown, County Tipperary, by whom he had issue,
WILLIAM ALLEN, Lord Proby (1779-1804); Captain, RN;
JOHN, 2nd Earl;
Granville Leveson;
Gertrude.
The 1st Earl espoused secondly, in 1787, Elizabeth, daughter of the Rt Hon George Grenville, and sister of George, 1st Marquess of Buckingham, and left by that lady at his decease, in 1828, three other daughters, namely,
Charlotte;
Frances;
Elizabeth.
The Probys were a Patrick family, viz. three Earls were appointed to the Order of St Patrick.

In 1860, Lord Carysfort married Charlotte, daughter of Rev Robert Booshy, but the marriage was childless, and the titles expired on the death of the 5th Earl.


GLENART CASTLE, near Arklow, County Wicklow, was originally a hunting lodge of ca 1750, enlarged in the castellated style during the early 1800s by John Proby, 1st Earl of Carysfort.

It was known for a while as Kilcarra Castle.

Between 1177 and 1185, large quantities of land were granted by Prince John acting on behalf of his father, HENRY II, to Theobald Walter from whom were descended the Butler Family and the Earls of Ormonde.

The Butlers held their possession in this area for the next 500 years.

Glenart was enlarged again in 1869.


It is a fairly austere structure, mainly two-storey, though partly of three storeys dominated by a square, battlemented tower.

There are large rectangular windows with hood mouldings, three-sided bows and a battlemented parapet.


The Castle was partially burnt in 1920, though the remaining half continued to be inhabited by the family as an occasional residence till it was sold during the 2nd World War to a religious order, which rebuilt it in an institutional style. 

Other seat ~ Elton Hall, Peterborough.
Former town house ~ 11 Lower Berkeley Street, London.

Carysfort arms courtesy of European Heraldry.   First published in May, 2012.

Friday, 24 June 2016

House of Stewart


This branch of the noble house of STEWART claims a common ancestor with the Earls of Galloway; namely, Sir William Stewart, of Garlies, from whose second son, Sir Thomas Stewart, of Minto.

WILLIAM STEWART, of Ballylawn Castle, County Donegal (great-grandson of John Stewart, who had a grant from CHARLES I of Stewart's Court Manor, where he erected Ballylawn Castle), took an active part in Ulster affairs in order to prevent the subversion of the constitution, which King JAMES II and his chief governor, the Earl of Tyrconnell, were attempting to effect.

He raised a troop of horse at his own expense when the city of Londonderry was occupied, and actively promoted the Protestant interest there by protecting those who were favourably disposed to WILLIAM III.

Mr Stewart was appointed lieutenant-colonel in the regiment commanded by Sir William Stewart, Viscount Mountjoy.

He married the daughter of William Stewart, of Fort Stewart, County Donegal (grandson of the Rt Hon Sir William Stewart Bt, whose descendant was created Baron Stewart of Ramelton and Viscount Mountjoy), and died leaving issue, a daughter,

MARTHA, who wedded John Kennedy, of Cultra, County Down; and two sons, of whom

THOMAS KENNEDY, the eldest, succeeded at Ballylawn Castle, and served as a captain in Lord Mountjoy's regiment.

He espoused Mary, second daughter of Bernard Ward (ancestor of the Viscounts Bangor), by Mary, sister of the Rt Rev Michael Ward, Lord Bishop of Derry; and dying without issue, 1740, was succeeded by his only brother,

ALEXANDER STEWART (1699-1781), who represented the city of Londonderry in parliament, and purchased the estate of MOUNT STEWART, County Down, from the Colville family.

He married, in 1737, his cousin Mary, only daughter of Alderman John Cowan, of Londonderry (by Anne Stewart, second daughter of Alexander Stewart, of Ballylawn Castle, and sister and sole heir of Sir Robert Cowan, Governor of Bombay, and had issue,
ROBERT, his heir;
William, died in infancy;
John, 1744-62;
Alexander;
Anne; Frances; Mary.
The eldest son,

ROBERT STEWART (1739-1821), of Ballylawn Castle, County Donegal, and of Mount Stewart, County Down, who, having represented the latter county in parliament, and having been sworn a member of the Privy Council, was elected to the Irish peerage, in 1789, as Baron Stewart.

His lordship was advanced to the dignity of Viscount Castlereagh in 1795, and Earl of Londonderry in 1796.

This nobleman was further advanced to the dignity of a marquessate, as MARQUESS OF LONDONDERRY, in 1816.

His lordship wedded firstly, in 1766, the Lady Sarah Frances Seymour-Conway, second daughter of Francis, 1st Marquess of Hertford, and had issue,
Alexander Francis, 1767-9;
ROBERT, his successor.
He wedded secondly, in 1775, the Lady Frances Pratt, eldest daughter of Charles, 1st Earl Camden, and had issue,
CHARLES WILLIAM, 3rd Marquess;
Alexander John, 1783-1800;
Thomas Henry, 1790-1810;
Frances Anne; Elizabeth Mary; Caroline; Georgiana;
Selina Sarah Juliana; Matilda Charlotte; Emily Jane; Catharine Octavia.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

ROBERT, 2nd Marquess (1769-1822), KG, GCH, PC.
The heir presumptive is his brother Lord Reginald Alexander Vane-Tempest-Stewart (b. 1977).
The heir presumptive's heir is his son Robin Gabriel Vane-Tempest-Stewart (b 2004).
Former seats ~ Mount Stewart, County Down; Wynyard Park, County Durham; Seaham Hall, near Stockton-on-Tees.

Former town residence ~ Londonderry House, Park Lane, London.

First published in March, 2012.

Thursday, 23 June 2016

The Brooke Baronetcy (1764)

THE BROOKE BARONETCY, OF COLEBROOKE, COUNTY FERMANAGH, WAS CREATED IN 1764 FOR THE RT HON ARTHUR BROOKE MP


SIR BASIL BROOKE (1567-1633), Knight, of Magherabeg and Brooke Manor, County Donegal, went over to Ulster during the reign of ELIZABETH I.

Sir Basil served under Charles Blount, 8th Lord Mountjoy, and was appointed governor of the town and castle of Donegal.

He was likewise one of the commissioners for the settlement of Ulster, and obtained from the crown large grants of land in County Donegal.

Sir Basil's son and successor (by Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of John Leycester, of Toft),

SIR HENRY BROOKE, Knight, of Brookeborough, County Fermanagh, Governor of Donegal, High Sheriff of County Fermanagh, 1669, MP for Brooke's Borough, received, in recompense for his services during the rebellion of 1641, grants of lands in County Fermanagh.

He married firstly, Elizabeth, daughter of Captain John Wynter; and secondly, Anne, daughter of Sir George St George Bt, of Carrickdrumrusk, County Leitrim.

For his third wife, Mr Brooke espoused Elizabeth, daughter of Henry, Lord Docwra.

He died in 1671, and was succeeded by the eldest son (by his second wife),

THOMAS BROOKE MP, of Donegal, Major in the Williamite Regiment of Foot, who wedded Catherine, daughter of Sir John Cole Bt, of Newlands, County Dublin, and sister of Cole, Lord Ranelagh.

Major Brooke died in 1696, leaving a son,

HENRY BROOKE (1671-1761), of Colebrooke, MP for and governor of County Fermanagh, who married, in 1711, Lettice, daughter of Mr Alderman Benjamin Burton, of the city of Dublin, and had issue,
ARTHUR, his heir;
FRANCIS, father of SIR HENRY BROOKE, 1ST BARONET;
Lettice.
Mr Brooke was succeeded by his eldest son,

THE RT HON ARTHUR BROOKE (1726-85), Governor of County Fermanagh, High Sheriff of Fermanagh, 1752, MP for County Fermanagh, 1761-83, Privy Counsellor, who married firstly, in 1751, Margaret, daughter of Thomas Fortescue, of Reynoldstown, County Louth, and had issue,
Henry, died in infancy;
Arthur, died in infancy;
Letitia; Selina Elizabeth.
Mr Brooke was created a baronet in 1764.

He died at Dublin, and his sons having predeceased him, the baronetcy became extinct.

The baronetcy was, however, revived in 1822, in favour of Sir Arthur's nephew, Henry Brooke.

The Brookeborough Papers are held at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

*****

IN HIS Brooke family history, Barton states that
...the first Basil Brooke [1567-1633] ... was a soldier-adventurer who came to Ireland in the late 16th century ... . He came as a captain in the English army bringing reinforcements to Ireland [in 1597], and later commanded a cavalry regiment under Sir Henry Docwra in the conquest of Ulster.
He distinguished himself as a servitor during the Tyrone wars and was one of those selected by the King for a proportion of the plantation. He was knighted in 1619, styled of Magherabeg and Brooke Manor, [Co. Donegal], became a Governor of [Co.] Donegal, and later was a member of the commission ordered by Charles I to enquire into how thoroughly the undertakers had fulfilled the conditions of their grants.
Thus the Brookes first entered Ulster under English arms and initially held their property in Donegal, not Fermanagh.

The former county was never truly colonised; due in part to its wildness and inaccessibility, colonists proved reluctant to attempt settlement.

Brooke appears to have been an energetic, determined and resourceful planter, eager to establish himself permanently in his adopted home.

Sir Basil's grant of 1,000 acres was in a rugged precinct set aside for servitors and natives.

The land was of poor quality, the barony in which the land was located being described in the Book of Survey and Distribution fifty years later as "mountainous, boggy, rocky and with many ... ways hardly passable".

By 1622, however, Brooke was reported as having repaired a round bawn within which a house was standing, which had been occupied by an English settler in 1619.

He also acquired other property.

One of the written complaints of the Earl of Tyrconnell was that the Lord Deputy had appointed Captain Brooke to live in his castle, and
constrained the Earl to accept such rents as he had given order of to the said Captain to pay and to pass a lease thereof and four acres of the best lands thereunto annexed, for one and twenty years unto the said Captain.
By 1611, with the help of a royal grant, Brooke had repaired the castle, voluntarily built a bawn to enclose it, and a strong house of lime and stone adjacent to it.

This relatively secure and less isolated dwelling he occupied with his wife.

He was in fact appointed constable of the castle and given the ownership of it and the town of Donegal, both of which were inherited, with his other property, in 1633 by his only son Henry, who was then married and of full age.

The latter fulfilled the confidence which the commissioners had earlier expressed in his father.

During the rising of 1641, he was successful in "preserving from plunder" the town and castle and the surrounding district.

He afterwards fought on the parliamentary side in the civil war, serving as a captain of foot.

In consequence, he acquired a substantial area of land, worth more than £900 yearly, mostly by grant.

These new estates lay in the adjacent counties of Monaghan and Fermanagh, and had become available through the forfeitures of property by two leading local native landholders.

In Fermanagh he acquired most of the confiscated estates, including the old ancestral home, at Largie, of Lord Maguire, who had been hanged at Tyburn and whose family had ruled the county for most of three centuries from their base at Lisnaskea.
The latter's property  [ca 30,000 acres], which had until then survived "as a little bit of Gaelic Ireland left untouched", now formed the basis of the future Colebrooke estate (It was confirmed to Henry by royal patent in 1667).
The Donegal estates of the senior branch of the family passed by direct descent through three generations to Henry Vaughan Brooke, member of parliament for the county in the late 18th century.

In 1761 Thomas Brooke's grandson, Sir Arthur Brooke, 1st and last baronet of the first (1764) creation, succeeded.

In Sir John Blaquiere's "Members of the House of Commons 1770-1773, Notes on Same 1773", the entry under Fermanagh is:
Sir Arthur Brooke, Bt, has the principal interest in the county and will continue to do so while he unites with Archdale. He has the character of being one of the worst tempered men living and very stingy. ...
Sir Arthur inherited through his grandmother's brother, Lord Ranelagh, large and valuable property [either in possession or reversion], in the city of Dublin, Tipperary, Clare and Wiltshire, at his death in 1785 ... [little] was left but Colebrooke, denuded of trees and heavily encumbered.

First Published in January, 2011.

Drumcondra House

THE COGHILL BARONETS OWNED 472 ACRES OF LAND IN COUNTY DUBLIN

The family of COGHILL was prominent in Yorkshire.

SIR JOHN COGHILL, LL.D, Master in Chancery in Ireland, married Hester, daughter of Tobias Cramer, of Ballyfoyle, County Kilkenny; and dying in 1699, left issue,
Marmaduke (Rt Hon), CHANCELLOR OF THE IRISH EXCHEQUER;
JAMES, of whom presently;
Hester, m Oliver Cramer, mother of
JOHN CRAMER.
The younger son,

JAMES COGHILL, LL.D, Registrar of the Prerogative Court, wedded Mary, sister of Thomas Pearson MP, of Rathmore, County Meath.

He died in 1734, leaving an only daughter and heir,

HESTER COGHILL, who espoused Charles Moore, Earl of Charleville (who dsp 1764, when that dignity and the barony of Tullamore became extinct).

Her ladyship married secondly, Major John Mayne, who assumed the name of COGHILL, and was created a baronet in 1781; but dying without an heir, that title expired.

The Countess of Charleville thus having no issue by either of her husbands, bequeathed her property, at her decease, to her cousin (refer to issue of Hester, daughter of Sir John Coghill, Master in Chancery),

JOHN CRAMER (1732-90), of Coghill Hall, Knaresborough, Yorkshire, who thereupon assumed the name of COGHILL, and was created a baronet in 1778.

Sir John wedded Maria, daughter of the Most Rev Josiah Hort, Lord Archbishop of Tuam, by whom he had issue,
JOHN, his successor;
JOSIAH, 3rd Baronet;
Judith; Eliza; Frances; Priscilla; Sophia.
He was succeeded by his elder son,

SIR JOHN CRAMER-COGHILL (1766-1817), 2nd Baronet, who assumed, in 1807, the surname and arms of COGHILL only.

He died without issue, when the title devolved upon his brother,

VICE-ADMIRAL SIR JOSIAH COGHILL (1773-1850), 3rd Baronet, who married firstly, in 1812, Miss Dodson, by whom he had three daughters,
Caroline Mary;
Emmeline Katherine Egerton;
Josephine.
He wedded secondly, in 1819, Anna Maria, eldest daughter of the Rt Hon Charles Kendal Bushe, Lord Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench in Ireland, by whom he had issue,
JOHN JOSCELYN, his successor;
Kendal Josiah William;
Rosanna Louisa; Sydney Alicia; Florence;
Georgina; Adelaide; Sylvia.
Sir Josiah was succeeded by his eldest son,

SIR JOHN JOSCELYN COGHILL, 4th Baronet (1826-1905), JP, DL, High Sheriff of County Dublin, 1859, who married, in 1851, the Hon Katherine Frances Plunket, daughter of John, 3rd Baron Plunket of Newton, and had issue,
NEVILL JOSIAH AYLMER;
EGERTON BUSHE, 5th Baronet;
Claude Plunkett;
Ethel Charlotte; Violet Alice Penrose.
Sir John's eldest son,

NEVILL JOSIAH AYLMER COGHILL VC (1852-79), Lieutenant, 24th Foot Regiment, was killed in action while saving the colours of his regiment.

His younger brother

SIR EGERTON BUSHE COGHILL, 5th Baronet (1853-1921), JP, DL, wedded, in 1893, Elizabeth Hildegarde Augusta, daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Henry Somerville, and had issue,
MARMADUKE NEVILL PATRICK SOMERVILLE, his heir;
Nevill Henry Kendal Aylmer, 1899-1980;
JOSCELYN AMBROSE CRAMER, 7th Baronet;
Katherine Adelaide Hildegarde.
Sir Egerton was succeeded by his eldest son,

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL SIR MARMADUKE NEVILL PATRICK SOMERVILLE COGHILL, 6th Baronet (1896-1981), TD, DL, who died unmarried, when the title devolved upon his brother,

SIR JOSCELINE AMBROSE CRAMER COGHILL, 7th Baronet;
  • Sir Joscelyn Ambrose Cramer Coghill, 7th Baronet (1902-83);
  • Sir Egerton James Nevill Tobias "Toby" Coghill, 8th Baronet (1930–2000);
  • Sir Patrick Kendal Farley Coghill, 9th Baronet (b 1960).


DRUMCONDRA HOUSE, Drumcondra, County Dublin, now All Hallows College, is an early 18th century house of considerable significance.

It comprises three storeys with two adjoining fronts.

The more august of the two has massive Corinthian pilasters which support a balustraded Corinthian entablature.

This feature is adorned with niches, aedicules and segmental pediments above the windows and two doorways.


The plainer front was designed by Sir Edward Lovett Pearce for Marmaduke Coghill, MP, Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer, and Judge of the Prerogative Court.

In the grounds is a temple with pediment and Corinthian pilasters.

Other former seats ~ Randall's Park, Surrey; Glen Barrahane Castle, Castletownshend, County Cork.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Loftus Hall

THE MARQUESSES OF ELY WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY WEXFORD, WITH 14,023 ACRES 


The family of LOFTUS, or, as it was anciently spelt, Lofthouse, appears, from the archives of York Minster, to have flourished in Yorkshire as early as the reign of ALFRED THE GREAT.

Before the advent of the Normans, this family held the town and lands of Loftus, Yorkshire, by thaneage, and after the Conquest, by military tenure.

The same records show that Christopher Lofthouse was prior of Helagh, Yorkshire, in 1460.

EDWARD LOFTUS, of Swineshead, Yorkshire, whose descendants have been, in different branches, thrice elevated to the Irish peerage, had two sons, namely,
ROBERT;
ADAM.
The elder son, Robert, whose second son,

ADAM LOFTUS, an eminent lawyer, was appointed LORD CHANCELLOR OF IRELAND in 1619; and created, in 1622, Viscount Loftus, of Ely, a dignity which expired with his lordship' grandson ARTHUR, 3rd Viscount.

The younger son,

THE MOST REV ADAM LOFTUS, accompanied, as private chaplain, the Viceroy, Thomas, Earl of Sussex, into Ireland, and was consecrated Lord Archbishop of Armagh, 1562-3.

In 1567, the Lord Primate was translated to the see of Dublin; and six years afterwards we find him Lord Keeper of the Great Seal.

In 1578, His Grace was constituted LORD CHANCELLOR OF IRELAND, and he continued to hold the seals until his death.

This esteemed divine having a principal share in the foundation of Trinity College, Dublin, was appointed by charter its first Provost, which office he resigned in 1594.

He married Jane, eldest daughter of Alan Purdon, of Lurgan Race, County Louth, and by her had twenty children, of whom seven died young. The survivors were eight sons and five daughters.

The Archbishop died in 1605, and was succeeded by his eldest son, 

SIR DUDLEY LOFTUS, of Rathfarnham, who wedded Anne, daughter of Sir Henry Bagenal, of Newry, and had, with other issue,
ADAM, 1st Viscount Lisburne;
NICHOLAS, of whose line we are about to treat;
Edward;
Samuel.
The second son of Sir Dudley Loftus, 

NICHOLAS, of Fethard, born in 1592, Joint Clerk of the Pells and of The Treasury in Ireland, wedded and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, 

SIR NICHOLAS LOFTUS, of Fethard, who married twice, and had several children, all of whom died issueless, when the estates descended to his brother,

HENRY LOFTUS, of Loftus Hall, who married twice and was succeeded, in 1716, by his elder son,

NICHOLAS LOFTUS, MP for County Wexford, who was elevated to the peerage as Baron Loftus, of Loftus Hall, in 1751.

His lordship was sworn of the privy council in 1753; nominated Governor of County Wexford, and advanced to a viscountcy, as Viscount Loftus, of Ely, in 1756.

He married firstly Anne, 2nd daughter of William, Viscount Duncannon, by whom he had issue,
NICHOLAS, his successor;
HENRY, succeeded as 4th Viscount Loftus;
Mary; Anne; Elizabeth.
His lordship wedded secondly, Letitia, daughter of Sir John Rowley, knight, by whom he had no issue.

He died in 1763, and was succeeded by his elder son, 

NICHOLAS, 2nd Viscount, who was advanced to the dignity of Earl of Ely in 1766.

He married Mary, eldest daughter and heir of Sir Gustavus Hume Bt, of Castle Hume, County Fermanagh; and dying in 1766, was succeeded by his only son, 

NICHOLAS, 2nd Earl, who died unmarried, in 1769, when the earldom expired, but the viscountcy and barony reverted to his uncle,

THE HON HENRY LOFTUS, as 4th Viscount, born in 1709.

His lordship was advanced to an earldom, as Earl of Ely, in 1771; and installed a Knight Founder of the Most Illustrious of St Patrick, in 1783.

Lord Loftus married twice, though died without issue, in 1783, when the titles became extinct; while the estates devolved upon his nephew, 

THE RT HON CHARLES TOTTENHAM, who then assumed the surname and arms of LOFTUS, and was created, in two years afterwards, Baron Loftus, of Loftus Hall.

His lorship was advanced to a viscountcy, as Viscount Loftus in 1789; Earl of Ely in 1794.

This nobleman was further advanced, to the dignity of a marquessate, as MARQUESS OF ELY, in 1800.
His lordship was postmaster-general of Ireland in 1789; privy counsellor; Knight of St Patrick; governor of Wexford; governor of Fermanagh; colonel, the Wexford Militia.
*****
GEORGE HENRY WELLINGTON, 7th Marquess (1903-69), styled Viscount Loftus between 1925-35, became known by the courtesy title Viscount Loftus when his father succeeded in the marquessate in 1925.

He was educated at Lancing College and served as a major in the North Irish Horse during the 2nd World War. He was also High Sheriff of Fermanagh in 1931. In 1935 he succeeded in the marquessate on the death of his father.

*****

CHARLES JOHN, 8th Marquess, who died in 2006 aged 92, was a Canadian prep school headmaster for some 40 years and a dogged, if silent, attender at the House of Lords for almost 30 years until his exclusion by Tony Blair's reforms. He was appalled by the "constitutional vandalism" that cost him his seat.

His eldest son, John, who was born in 1943, succeeded to the titles as 9th Marquess.

The Ely Papers are deposited at PRONI.


LOFTUS HALL, near Fethard-on-Sea, County Wexford, is, according to Mark Bence-Jones, a gaunt, three-storey mansion of 1871, with rows of plate-glass windows and a parapet, incorporating parts of a previous, late 17th century house.

The house stands near the tip of Hook Head, an extremely wind-swept spot bereft of trees and shelter.


The present house was built after his coming-of-age by the 4th Marquess of Ely (who also had plans for Ely Lodge in County Fermanagh).

It contains an impressive staircase hall.


In 1917, Loftus Hall was bought by the Sisters of Providence and turned into a convent and a school for young girls interested in joining the order.

In 1983, it was purchased by Michael Deveraux, who re-opened it as "Loftus Hall Hotel", which was subsequently closed again in the late 1990s.


It was privately owned by Deveraux's surviving family until late 2008, when it was sold to an unnamed buyer, rumoured to be "Bono" of U2 fame.

While in need of repair at the time of writing, the nine-bay mansion comprises seven reception rooms, twenty-two bedrooms and a function room spread across three floors.

Ely arms courtesy of European Heraldry.   First published in May, 2012.

Magherintemple House

THE CASEMENT FAMILY OWNED 3,312 ACRES OF LAND IN COUNTY ANTRIM


This family came over to Ulster from Ramsey, Isle of Man, early in the 18th century.

HUGH CASEMENT married, in 1740, Elizabeth, daughter of George Higginson, of Magheragall.

He died in 1797, having had issue,
George, surgeon RN;
ROGER, of whom presently;
The second son,

ROGER CASEMENT, of Harryville, County Antrim, wedded firstly, Catherine, brother of Julius Cosnahan, of Peel, Isle of Man, and had, with other issue,
THOMAS, of whom presently;
Robert (Rev).
Mr Casement espoused secondly, in 1819, Margaret, daughter of Andrew McQuilty, and had by her further issue,
George, of Fenagh, Co Antrim, barrister;
JOHN, succeeded his half-brother;
Julius.
Mr Casement died in 1832, ans was succeeded by his eldest surviving son,

THOMAS CASEMENT JP (1799-1874), of Ballee House, County Antrim, High Sheriff of County Antrim, 1874, who married, in 1848, Dorinda Deborah, daughter of Thomas Abbot JP, of Mount Bellew, County Galway, and left an only daughter and heiress,

CATHERINE COSNAHAN CASEMENT, of Ballee House, who wedded, in 1869, Colonel Eldred Thomas Pottinger, Royal Artillery.

His half brother,

JOHN CASEMENT JP (1825-1902), of Magherintemple, County Antrim, High Sheriff of County Antrim, 1881, married firstly, in 1849, Charlotte, daughter of Brabazon Newcomen, of Camla House, County Rosscommon, and had issue,
ROGER, of whom presently;
Brabazon Newcomen, MD.
John, Rear-Admiral.
Mr Casement wedded secondly, in 1859, Charlotte, daughter of Alexander Miller, of Ballycastle.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

ROGER CASEMENT JP DL (1850-1928), of Magherintemple, who married, in 1877, Susanna, daughter of James Beatty, and had issue,
JOHN, of whom presently;
Francis, DSO, Major-General in the army;
Roger Hugh;
Robert James;
Edgar Reginald.
The eldest son,

JOHN CASEMENT DSO DL (1880-1944), of Magherintemple, a captain in the Royal Navy, married, in 1916, ANNA BEATRICE, daughter of John Frederick William Hodges, of Glenravel, County Antrim.

He died without male issue. His widow,

ANNA BEATRICE, MRS CASEMENT OBE (1887-1975), inherited Magherintemple for her lifetime, with reversion to her nephew,  Francis Charles Casement.

*****

Patrick Casement OBE was Chairman of the National Trust's  Northern Ireland Committee, 2000-2010. 
He is a zoology graduate from Oxford and holds a masters degree in Ecology; farms a large beef and sheep farm; has previously served on the Northern Ireland Council for Nature Conservation and the Countryside.  
(Sir) Roger Casement was a cousin of Patrick Casement's grandfather.


MAGHERINTEMPLE HOUSE, near Ballycastle, County Antrim, was built ca 1875 in the Scottish-Baronial style, the seat of the Casement family.

Mr Roger Casement (Sir Roger Casement CMG) was a member of this family.

An earlier, quite modest, house called Churchfield was described in 1835 as being a plain two storey dwelling, the property of the Casement family from 1790.

It was considerably enlarged in 1874-75 for John Casement, adding an austere Scottish-baronial block in Ballyvoy stone with gate lodge in matching style.


The grimness of the architecture is, to some degree, offset by the good high position of the house and its splendid views. The gardens are maintained.

There is a walled garden on a slope, with a bog garden at the bottom.

The walled garden is fully planted up with vegetables, fruit and ornamental plants.

The present layout dates from 1973. There are both woodland and shelter trees.

The gate lodge replaced an earlier lodge located on the opposite side of the gates.

Two small stone figures that are placed in the rockery in the garden are said to have come from Culfeightrin Church.


Magherintemple gate lodge is available for rent.

First published in December, 2010.