Thursday, 27 December 2018

Wood Stuart, Outfitter


When I was a lad at prep school the uniform was supplied by a shop called J Wood Stuart, 19 Howard Street, Belfast.

Their motto was for man and man junior.

I have unearthed a receipt dated the 3rd July, 1972, for the following:-

  • One Brackenber House blazer     @ £6.55
  • One B/H tie                                  @ £0.55
  • One B/H cap                                @ £0.95
  • Discount                                           £0.15
  • TOTAL                                             £7.90
According to my Bank of England inflation calculator, that is about £80 in today's money.

The young Brackenbrian in the image below must have been en route to or from a Games Day, because we wore shirts and ties.

A Brackenbrian wearing uniform

Incidentally, they weren't overly generous with the discount!

First published in August, 2011.

Monday, 24 December 2018

Kenneth Branagh

HONORARY BURGESS OF THE CITY OF BELFAST, 2018


Elected and admitted by the Council of the City of Belfast under the Municipal Privilege (Ireland) Act, 1875:-


SIR KENNETH CHARLES BRANAGH
Knight bachelor

In recognition of his "outstanding achievements and international status in drama and cinema, as an actor, director, producer and screenwriter".

Van Morrison

HONORARY BURGESS OF THE CITY OF BELFAST, 2013


Elected and admitted by the Council of the City of Belfast under the Municipal Privilege (Ireland) Act, 1875:-

SIR GEORGE IVAN (VAN) MORRISON, OBE
Knight Bachelor
Officer of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire 

In recognition of "the extraordinary contribution made to the City by [Sir] George Ivan ‘Van’ Morrison; achieving international acclaim over the last fifty years, he has portrayed a majestic image of Belfast and continues to inspire generations through his inspirational music." 

Sunday, 23 December 2018

Mary Peters

HONORARY BURGESS OF THE CITY OF BELFAST

Elected and admitted by the Council of the City of Belfast under the Municipal Privilege (Ireland) Act, 1875:-


LADY MARY ELIZABETH PETERS, LG CH DBE
Lady Companion of the Most Noble Order of the Garter
Member of the Order of the Companions of Honour
Dame Commander of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
Her Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for the County Borough of Belfast, 2009-14

"Over the past 40 years she has served as an ambassador for Belfast across the world and has been tireless in her efforts to promote sport and the benefits it brings to young people,"

"Accordingly, in the recognition of this service, the council agrees that Dame Mary Peters is hereby elected and admitted as a Freeman of the City of Belfast."

Captain Dame Mary Peters CH DBE RNR in 2013

I'd like to express my personal delight and compliments to Lady Mary, a wonderful ambassador for Belfast and Northern Ireland.

First published in November, 2012.

Saturday, 22 December 2018

Cathedral Donors

Inside Armagh's Anglican cathedral, a stained-glass window above the West Door displays the armorial bearings of the ten principal donors during the great 1834 restoration of the building, viz.

  • 1st Earl O'Neill KP PC; 
  • Sir Thomas Molyneux Bt; 
  • Samuel Blacker; 
  • Maxwell Close; 
  • James Wood; 
  • Elias Elsler; 
  • Thomas Keers; 
  • Roger Hall; 
  • R Livingstone; 
  • Sir William Verner Bt MP.

Could Lord O'Neill's act of beneficence have been meant as a kind of atonement?

In 1566, Shane O'Neill ‘utterly destroyed the Cathedral by fire, lest the English should again lodge in it’.

In 1641, it again became a target for the O'Neills, when Sir Phelim O'Neill burned it.
Sir Phelim, incidentally, met his timely fate in 1653, when he was caught and executed on the orders of William, 5th Baron Charlemont, for the murder of his brother Toby, the 3rd Baron.
Perhaps a more plausible explanation is that, as a Knight of St Patrick, Lord O'Neill was well acquainted with the Prelate of the Order, Lord John Beresford, Lord Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland.

First published in May, 2013.

Friday, 21 December 2018

The Darnley Estate

THE EARLS OF DARNLEY WERE THE GREATEST LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY MEATH, WITH 25,463 ACRES


JOHN BLIGH (c1617-66), a Citizen of London, the founder of this noble family, was employed as agent of the adventurers for the forfeited estates by the rebellion of 1641, and in that capacity arrived in Ireland during the usurpation of Cromwell, when he became an adventurer himself to a large extent.

Mr Bligh was returned for Athboy in the first parliament after the restoration.

He married Catherine, sister of the Rt Rev William Fuller, Lord Bishop of Lincoln, and was succeeded by his only son,

THE RT HON THOMAS BLIGH (1654-1710), of Rathmore, County Meath, MP for Rathboy, 1692-3, County Meath, 1695-1710, and of the Privy Council to QUEEN ANNE, who wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Colonel James Naper, of Loughcrew, in the same county, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

JOHN BLIGH (1687-1728), MP for Trim, 1709-13, Athboy, 1713-21, who espoused, in 1713, the Lady Theodosia Hyde, then only daughter and heir of Edward, 3rd Earl of Clarendon, by Catherine, Baroness Clifton, and had issue,
EDWARD, his successor;
JOHN, succeeded his brother;
Mary; Anne; Theodosia.
Mr Bligh was elevated to the peerage, in 1721, in the dignity of Baron Clifton, of Rathmore, and Viscount Darnley.

His lordship was further advanced to the dignity of an earldom, in 1725, as EARL OF DARNLEY.

He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son,

EDWARD, 2nd Earl (1715-47), who had previously inherited the English barony of CLIFTON on the decease of his mother, 1722.

His lordship died unmarried, and the honours devolved upon his brother,

JOHN, 3rd Earl (1719-81), who espoused, in 1766, Mary, daughter and heir of John Stoyte, of Street, County Westmeath, barrister, and had issue,
JOHN, his successor;
Edward, General in the army;
William;
Mary; Theodosia; Catherine.
His lordship was succeeded by his elder son,

JOHN, 4th Earl (1767-1831), who married, in 1791, Elizabeth, thgird daughter of the Rt Hon William Brownlow, of Lurgan, County Armagh, and had issue,
EDWARD, his successor;
John Duncan;
Mary; Elizabeth.
This nobleman presented, in 1829, a petition to the King, claiming the dukedom of LENNOX, as heir of line of Charles, 6th Duke of Lennox and 4th Duke of Richmond, at whose death, in 1672, CHARLES II was served His Grace's heir.

As His Majesty's (legitimate) issue became extinct in 1807, with His Eminence the Cardinal Duke of York, and as that personage was the last heir male of the STUARTS, the Earl of Darnley put forward his claim as heir general, being descended from Catherine, sister of the 6th Duke.

The petition was referred to the House of Lords, but their lordships came to no decision about it.

His lordship was succeeded by his elder son,

EDWARD, 5th Earl (1795-1835), who wedded, in 1825, Emma Jane, daughter of Sir Henry Parnell Bt, and had issue,
JOHN, his successor;
Edward Vesey;
another son;
Elizabeth Caroline; a daughter.
His lordship, Lord-Lieutenant of County Meath, was succeeded by his eldest son,

JOHN, 6th Earl (1827-96), Hereditary High Steward of Gravesend and Milton.
The heir apparent is the present holder's only son, Ivo Donald Bligh, styled Lord Clifton (b 1968).

Darnley Estate Office

During the 1641 Rebellion, the town of Athboy, County Meath, was captured by Owen Roe O'Neill.

With Cromwell and the collapse of the Rebellion, much of the land ownership passed to adventurers from England.

In 1694, the town's 'lands and commons' and several other denominations of land were erected into a manor and granted to Thomas Bligh, MP for Athboy, who had earlier purchased almost 3,000 acres in the area of Athboy.

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the Darnleys planned and carried out the development of Athboy, giving it the form which prevails today.

It was not until 1909, under the 1903 Wyndham Act, that Francis Walter, 8th Earl, auctioned the town of Athboy.


The Darnley estate office was finally closed in 1948.

Today the erstwhile Darnley estate office on the main street is the Darnley Lodge Hotel.

Cobham Hall

Former Seats - Cobham Hall, near Gravesend, Kent; Rathmore, County Meath.

Former London residence ~ 46 Berkeley Square, W1

First published in July, 2012.   Darnley arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Friday, 30 November 2018

New DL

APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY LIEUTENANT


Mrs Fionnuala Jay-O’Boyle CBE, Lord-Lieutenant of the County Borough of Belfast, has been pleased to appoint:-
CORBETT, Mrs Patricia Sarah,
Belfast,
To be a Deputy Lieutenant of the County Borough, her Commission bearing date the day of November,  2018.


Lord Lieutenant of the County Borough

Monday, 26 November 2018

Ballyconra House

THE VISCOUNTS MOUNTGARRET WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY KILKENNY, WITH 14,073 ACRES


This is a branch of the noble house of BUTLER, Earls and Marquesses of Ormonde, springing from

THE HON RICHARD BUTLER (1500-71), second son of Piers, 8th Earl of Ormonde, who was elevated to the peerage, in 1550, in the dignity of VISCOUNT MOUNTGARRET, County Wexford.

His lordship married firstly, Eleanor, daughter of Theobald Butler, of Nechum, County Kilkenny, and had one son, Edmund; and secondly, Catherine, daughter and heir of Peter Barnewall, of Stackallan, County Meath, and had issue, Barnewall, who died unmarried, Pierce, and other issue.

He espoused thirdly, in 1541, Anne, daughter of John, Lord Killeen, from whom he was divorced in the first year of his marriage.

His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

EDMUND, 2nd Viscount (c1562-1602), who married Grizzel, daughter of Barnaby, 1st Baron Upper Ossory, and was father of

RICHARD, 3rd Viscount (1578-1651), who wedded firstly, Margaret, eldest daughter of Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone, by whom alone he had issue, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

EDMUND, 4th Viscount (1595-1679), 

Earls of Kilkenny (1793)



Viscounts Mountgarret (continued)


The current heir presumptive is the present holder's brother, Edmund Henry Richard Butler (b 1962). 
Piers James Richard [Butler], 18th and present Viscount,  is de jure 27th Earl of Ormonde and 21st Earl of Upper Ossory following the death of the 7th Marquess of Ormonde in 1997. 


BALLYCONRA HOUSE is a seven-bay, two-storey over basement house with dormer attic, dated 1724, on an L-shaped plan, possibly originally a mill owner's house with two-bay two-storey side elevations, and single-bay two-storey double-pile return to north-west. Now in use as offices.

This is a well-appointed substantial house representing an important element of the early 18th century architectural heritage of County Kilkenny.

It may originally have had associations with the nearby Ballyconra Mills, though its primary significance was for the connections with the Butler Family, Viscounts Mountgarret, late of Ballyragget Castle (1495) together with the Cahill family.

Ballyconra is located on a slightly elevated site.

This house makes an important impression in a landscape dominated by late 20th-century industrial ranges.  

The house is said to be haunted by the ghost of Edmund, 12th Viscount Mountgarret and first and last Earl of Kilkenny, who died in 1846 and was the last Mountgarret to live there. 

Following Lord Kilkenny's death, the house was occupied by Michael Cahill, agent to the 13th Viscount, by whose descendants it was afterwards acquired.

The Mountgarrets' other seat was Nidd Hall, near Ripley, Yorkshire; sold in 1968.

First published in February, 2012.   Mountgarret arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Friday, 23 November 2018

New DL

APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY LIEUTENANT

The Earl of Caledon KCVO, Lord-Lieutenant of County Armagh, has been pleased to appoint
Mr Simon CASSELLS QVRM
Portadown
County Armagh
To be a Deputy Lieutenant of the County his Commission bearing date the day of 11th November 2018.

Friday, 16 November 2018

1st Earl of Breadalbane and Holland

THE EARLS OF BREADALBANE AND HOLLAND WERE THE GREATEST LANDOWNERS IN PERTHSHIRE, WITH 234,166 ACRES

This ancient family claims a common ancestor with the ducal house of ARGYLL, namely,

SIR DUNCAN CAMPBELL, of Lochawe, who was created Lord Campbell, of Argyll, by JAMES II, King of Scotland, in 1445.

His lordship wedded the Lady Marjorie Stewart, daughter of Robert, Duke of Albany, and granddaughter of ROBERT II, King of Scotland, by whom he left two sons,

ARCHIBALD, his successor, from whom the house of ARGYLL derives; and

SIR COLIN CAMBELL, upon whom his father settled the estate of Glenorchy, which had come into the Campbell family in the time of DAVID II of Scotland, by the marriage of Margaret Glenorchy with John Campbell.
"Sir Colin" says Douglas, "was a man of high renown for military prowess, and for the virtues of social and domestic life. He was a stream of many tides against the foes of his people, but like the gale that moves the heath to those who sought his aid."
He married firstly, Mary, daughter of the Earl of Lennox, but by her had no issue.
He married secondly, Margaret, second daughter and co-heir of John, Lord Lorne, with whom he got a third of that lordship, which still remains in the family, and Sir Colin quartered henceforward the GALLEY OF LORNE, with his paternal achievement.
By this marriage, his only son,

SIR DUNCAN CAMPBELL, who, in his father's lifetime, was designated of Glenorchy, by charter, dated 1480. The great-grandson of this gentleman,

SIR DUNCAN CAMPBELL, of Glenorchy, being in high favour with JAMES VI, was made, by that monarch, in 1617, heritable keeper of the forests of Mamlorn, Bendaskerlie etc, with many valuable privileges; and created, in 1625, a baronet, and High Sheriff of Perthshire, for life.

Sir Duncan married twice, and was succeeded at his decease, in 1631, by the eldest son of his first wife, Jean, daughter of John, Earl of Atholl, Lord Chancellor of Scotland,

SIR COLIN CAMPBELL, 2nd Baronet, who died without issue in 1640, and was succeeded by his brother,

SIR ROBERT CAMPBELL, 3rd Baronet, whose eldest son,

SIR JOHN CAMPBELL (1635-1717), 4th Baronet, being the chief creditor of George, 6th Earl of Caithness, obtained a disposition from that nobleman of his whole estate and earldom, with the hereditary jurisdictions and titles; and upon the demise of his lordship, in 1676, was created, by patent dated 1677, Earl of Caithness; but in a few years afterwards, that dignity being allowed by parliament to be vested in George Sinclair (who became, in consequence, 7th Earl of Caithness), Sir John Campbell obtained a new patent of nobility, dated 1681.

Sir John was created EARL OF BREADALBANE AND HOLLAND.

His lordship wedded firstly, Mary, daughter of Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland (which earl was beheaded in 1649), by whom he had two sons.

He married secondly, Mary, Dowager Countess of Caithness, 3rd daughter of Archibald, Marquess of Argyll; but by her had no surviving issue.

This nobleman married a third time, and had a daughter, Mary, who wedded Sir Archibald Cockburn of Langton Bt.
The 1st Earl is described, by John Macky, as having the gravity of a Spaniard, the cunning of a fox, the wisdom of a serpent, and the slipperiness of an eel.
His lordship died in 1716, and passing over his eldest son, Duncan Lord Ormelie, was succeeded by his 2nd son,

JOHN, 2nd Earl.
  • John Campbell, 3rd Earl (1692–1782)
    • Hon Henry Campbell (c. 1721-27)
    • Hon George Campbell (d 1744)
    • John Campbell, Lord Glenorchy (1738–71)

Marquesses of Breadalbane; First creation (1831)

Earls of Breadalbane and Holland (1681; Reverted)

  • John Alexander Gavin Campbell, 6th Earl (1824–71)
  • Gavin Campbell, 7th Earl (1851–1922) (created Marquess of Breadalbane in 1885).

Marquesses of Breadalbane; Second creation (1885)

Earls of Breadalbane and Holland (1681; Reverted)

  • Iain Edward Herbert Campbell, 8th Earl (1885–1923)
  • John Romer Boreland Campbell, 10th and last Earl (1919–95).

TAYMOUTH CASTLE, Perthshire, was the main seat of the Earls of Breadalbane and Holland until 1922.

Built in the neo-Gothic style on a lavish scale, no expense was spared on the castle's interior, which was decorated with extravagant sumptuousness incorporating carvings, plasterwork and murals.

Panels of medieval stained glass and Renaissance woodwork were incorporated into the scheme.

Much of this decor survives, though the castle has lost most of its original rich furnishings.

It has been empty since 1979, although plans have been put forward for its redevelopment as a luxury hotel.


In 1720, the 2nd Earl commissioned William Adam to remodel the house and lay out extensive formal gardens.

The 2nd Earl's son oversaw further changes in the 1750s, and by the 1780s the formal gardens had been replaced with a picturesque landscape.

The 4th Earl called upon Robert Mylne to prepare plans for a new "chateau" in 1789, though they were not carried out.

Ten years later the main block of the old house was demolished, to be replaced from 1806 by a Gothic building to the designs of the brothers James and Archibald Elliot.

The English-Italian Francis Bernasconi carried out the ornate plasterwork of the staircase and drawing rooms between 1809-12.

In 1818, the old east wing was pulled down and replaced by a two-storey wing designed by William Atkinson.

The 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane completed the improvements from 1838, by the remodelling of William Adam's west wing, which was enlarged and refaced to match the main block.

This time the architect was James Gillespie Graham, with interiors designed by A. W. N. Pugin.

The works were complete by 1842, in time for the first visit to Scotland of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, when they stayed at Taymouth for three days.

On the death of the 2nd Marquess, Taymouth passed to a distant cousin, along with the earldom of Breadalbane. The marquessate was re-created for his son Gavin Campbell in 1885.

The family estates were much reduced during his tenure, and on his death in 1922 Taymouth Castle was sold.

It was converted into a hotel, opening in 1929, with an 18-hole golf course designed by James Braid in the grounds.

It was used as a hospital for Polish troops during the 2nd World War; and between 1950-68 it housed the Civil Defence Corps training school for Scotland.

Taymouth was subsequently used by a boarding school for American children.

This closed in 1979 and the building has since lain empty, though the golf course has continued to be operated separately.

In 2004, it was reported that plans to redevelop the castle as a "six-star" hotel had been approved by Perth and Kinross Council.

By 2006, the buildings was weathertight, but work stopped in late 2006, and in 2009 the company restoring Taymouth Castle was declared insolvent.

Following the purchase of the estate by Meteor Asset Management, work re-commenced late in 2010 and, despite financial problems, the restoration was continuing in 2012.

First published in January, 2014.   Breadalbane arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Sunday, 21 October 2018

Londonderry State Coach


The State Coach is usually on display at the National Trust's Mount Stewart estate, County Down, former seat of the Marquesses of Londonderry.


A new coach-house was made for the coach, which used to be based at the family's grand London residence, Londonderry House, Park Lane.


The coach  (or chariot) is exquisite in its detail and craftsmanship.


The Londonderry coat-of-arms, crests and coronets adorn it.

7th Marquess & Marchioness

The walls of the coach-house tell its story: it only seems to have been used on state occasions.


The coach is on loan from the present Marquess.

First published in 2010.

Saturday, 13 October 2018

Tyrone DLs

APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY LIEUTENANTS

Mr Robert Scott OBE, Lord-Lieutenant of County Tyrone, has been pleased to appoint
Mr Charles Gregory PARKE
Omagh
County Tyrone 
Mr Peter David WATERSON
Omagh
County Tyrone
To be Deputy Lieutenants of the County, his Commission bearing date 5th day of October, 2018.

Robert Scott

Lord Lieutenant of the County

Saturday, 22 September 2018

New DL

APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY LIEUTENANT
Mrs Alison Millar, Lord-Lieutenant of County Londonderry, has been pleased to appoint:-
Mrs Lorraine Martha YOUNG JP
Portrush
County Antrim,
To be a Deputy Lieutenant of the County, her Commission bearing date the 7th day of September, 2018.

Friday, 21 September 2018

Prince Andrew in Northern Ireland

Thursday, 20th September, 2018

THE DUKE OF YORK, Baron Killyleagh, this afternoon visited Belleek Pottery, Belleek, County Fermanagh, and was received by Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of County Fermanagh (the Viscount Brookeborough KG).

His Royal Highness later visited Lough Erne Yacht Club, Gublusk Bay, County Fermanagh.

Friday, 21st September, 2018.

THE DUKE OF YORK, Baron Killyleagh, this morning visited a Search and Rescue Exercise at Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, County Fermanagh, and was received by Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of County Fermanagh (the Viscount Brookeborough KG).

His Royal Highness, Founder, Pitch@Palace, later held Pitch@Palace on Tour Belfast at Ormeau Baths, Ormeau Avenue, Belfast, and was received by Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of the County Borough of Belfast (Mrs. Fionnuala-Jay O’Boyle CBE).

HRH this afternoon opened the Fintech Hub at Danske Bank, Donegall Square West, Belfast.

His Royal Highness this evening held a Business Dinner at Hillsborough Castle, County Down.

Saturday, 22nd September, 2018.

THE DUKE OF YORK, Colonel-in-Chief, The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd, 87th and The Ulster Defence Regiment), this morning presented new Colours to 1st and 2nd Battalions at Titanic Slipway, Queen's Road, Titanic Quarter, Belfast, and was received by Her Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant of the County Borough of Belfast (Mrs Fionnuala-Jay O'Boyle CBE).

Tuesday, 18 September 2018

Killeen Castle

THE EARLS OF FINGALL WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY MEATH, WITH 9,589 ACRES

This noble family was of Danish origin, but its settlement in Ireland is so remote that nothing certain can be ascertained as to the precise period.

So early as the 11th century, we find

JOHN PLUNKETT, of Beaulieu, County Meath, the constant residence of the elder branch of his descendants.

The successor at Beaulieu at the beginning of the 13th century,

JOHN PLUNKETT, living at the time of HENRY III, had two sons,
John, ancestor of the BARONS LOUTH;
RICHARD, of whom hereafter.
The younger son,

RICHARD PLUNKETT, of Rathregan, County Meath, who, with his son and heir, RICHARD PLUNKETT, by royal writs of parliamentary summons, was summoned to, and sat in, the parliaments and council of 1374; one as a baron, and the other "de consilio regis".

To the same parliament and council was also summoned as a baron "Waltero de Cusake Militi", Lord of Killeen, whose heir general afterwards, as wife of Christopher Plunkett, was previously thought to have first brought the dignity of a parliamentary barony into this branch of the Plunkett family, but how erroneously may best be seen by reference to the writs of summons during the reign of EDWARD III, before alluded to.

The younger Richard Plunkett was father of

SIR CHRISTOPHER PLUNKETT, Knight; who, as a recompense for the services he had rendered in the wars of Ireland, and as an indemnity for the expenses he had incurred, had a grant of a sum of money from HENRY VI, in 1426; before which time he was High Sheriff of Meath; and, in 1432, was deputy to Sir Thomas Stanley, Knight, Lord Deputy of Ireland.

Sir Christopher was created, ca 1426, BARON KILLEEN.

He married, in 1403, Joan, only daughter and heir of Sir Lucas Cusack, Knight, Lord of Killeen, Dunsany, and Gerardstown, County Meath, and became, in her right, proprietor of the Barony of Killeen, and was succeeded by his son and heir,

CHRISTOPHER, 2nd Baron (who, in an act of parliament during the reign of HENRY VI was called "Christofre Plunkett le puisne Seigneur de Killeen").

This feudal Lord wedded twice: firstly, to Genet, daughter of Bellew, of Bellewstown; by whom he had two sons.

He espoused secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Wells, LORD CHANCELLOR OF IRELAND, by whom he had a daughter and two sons.

Sir Christopher died in 1462, and was succeeded by his elder son,

CHRISTOPHER PLUNKETT, 3rd Baron (1440-c1469); who had summons to parliament in 1463.

His lordship died without issue, and was succeeded by his brother,

EDMOND, 4th Baron (c1450-1510), who had a son and heir,

JOHN, 5th Baron, who was sworn of the privy council of HENRY VIII, and was found by inquisition to have had four sons,
Patrick, dsp;
CHRISTOPHER, heir to his brother;
Henry;
James.
The eldest son,

PATRICK, 6th Baron (1521-c1526), was succeeded by his brother,

CHRISTOPHER, 7th Baron, who succeeded to the titles and estates.

His lordship was an active and gallant nobleman, who discharged many high functions and commissions under the royal authority.

He sat in the parliament of 1509, and having married the granddaughter of the 8th Baron Slane, left issue, three daughters, his co-heirs,
Maude, m 3rd Baron Louth;
Catherine, m David Sutton;
Margaret, m Nicholas Aylmer.
He died about 1567, and was succeeded by his brother,

JAMES, 8th Baron (c1542-95), whose inheritance of the ancient family dignity was not opposed or questioned by the daughters, co-heirs of his deceased brother, and he took his place in the House of Lords in 1585.

In 1589, he enfeoffed trustees in his family estates, and was succeeded at his decease by his son and heir,

CHRISTOPHER, 9th Baron (1564-1613), who, when aged 31, sat in the parliament of 1613; and dying soon afterwards, was succeeded by his eldest son,

LUKE, 10th Baron (1589-1637), styled Lucas More.

This nobleman had a large grant of territory in 1613, and was created, in 1628, EARL OF FINGALL, JAMES I precluding the honour by a most flattering letter beginning thus:-
"That having received good testimonies of the virtuous and many good parts of his right trusty and well-beloved subject, the lord Baron Killeen, being one of the ancient nobility of Ireland, His Majesty was pleased" ... etc etc.
His lordship married four times, and by his second marriage with Susannah, fifth daughter of Edward, 1st Baron Ardee, had issue,
CHRISTOPHER, his successor;
George, ancestor of the 6th Earl.
His lordship was succeeded by his elder son,

CHRISTOPHER, 2nd Earl; who, having been made prisoner at the battle of Rathmines, died two weeks later, in 1649, at Dublin Castle, and was succeeded by his son (by Mabel, daughter of Nicholas, 1st Viscount Kingland),

LUKE, 3rd Earl (1639-84); who was restored to his estates and honours by the Court of Claims, and was succeeded at his decease by his only son,

PETER, 4th Earl (1678-1718); who was outlawed by the name of Luke, in 1691, for his loyalty to his legitimate sovereign, JAMES II, but the outlawry was reversed six years later, 1697.

His lordship wedded Frances, third daughter of Sir Edward Hales Bt, and had issue,
JUSTIN, his successor;
Margaret; Emilia; Mary.
He was succeeded by his only son,

JUSTIN, 5th Earl, who died in 1734, without issue, and intestate, and was succeeded in his titles and estates by his cousin,

ROBERT, 6th Earl, who enjoyed the honours without opposition of question on the part of the three daughters and heirs lineal of Peter, 4th Earl.

About a century later, however, the grandson of the youngest daughter, Maurice O'Connor, made claim to the Barony of Killeen, as a barony created by writ, and, as such, inheritable through females.

Like all other claims of the same nature, it has been unsuccessful, though brought forward at a time when the feelings of the Irish government were violently excited against the Earl of Fingall.

Robert, 6th Earl, was a captain in Berwick's regiment, in the service of France.

He espoused Mary, daughter of Roger Magenis, of Iveagh, County Down; and dying in 1738, left (with a daughter, Anne) a son and successor,

ARTHUR JAMES, 7th Earl (1731-93), then in his seventh year.

His lordship married, in 1755, Henrietta Maria, only daughter and heir of William Wollascot, of Woolhampton, Berkshire, and had issue,
ARTHUR JAMES, his successor;
Luke;
Robert;
William;
Theresa.
He was succeeded by his eldest son,

ARTHUR JAMES, 8th Earl (1759-1836), KP, who was created a Peer of the United Kingdom, in 1831, by the title of Baron Fingall, of Woolhampton Lodge, Berkshire.
The titles became extinct on the death of the 12th Earl.


KILLEEN CASTLE, near Dunsany, County Meath, is said originally to have been a Norman fortification, built for the de Lacy magnates, and held from 1172 by the Cusack family, beginning with Geoffrey de Cusack.

The castle was then held from 1399 by successors by marriage (to Lady Joan de Cusack), the Plunketts.

Killeen Castle was originally built by Geoffrey de Cusack around 1181. The date is carved above the doorway.

The castle fell into disrepair in the late 17th century, was leased out, and was not restored until around 1779, when parts of the demesne were landscaped and some of the estate features were added.


Significant reworking was carried out from 1803-13 under the supervision of Francis Johnston, and in 1841, much of the castle was demolished and rebuilt (using much existing material) by the 9th Earl of Fingall, in the style of a small Windsor Castle.

The two towers added have the dates 1181 and 1841 inscribed, and at the time of completion, it was claimed that Killeen had 365 windows.

The 12th and last Earl sold Killeen Castle and Estate, in 1951, to Sir Victor Sassoon.

Lord Fingall remained as manager of the stud farm established near the castle.

In 1953, Lord and Lady Fingall moved to a contemporary house built in the grounds, and most of the house contents were sold.

Sassoon died in 1961 and his heirs sold the estate on in 1963, to the French art dealer and racehorse owner, Daniel Wildenstein.

Lord Fingall moved from the estate to Corballis on the Dunsany estate, then The Commons.

He died in 1984 and is buried at Dunsany Church.

In 1978, the castle and estate were sold to the advertiser Basil Brindley, who continued the stud farm operation.

In 1981, the castle was burnt out in an arson attack, being left abandoned for many years.

The lands and buildings were sold again in 1989, to Christopher Slattery.

In 1997, Snowbury Ltd purchased the castle and its grounds, with a vision to create the estate that exists today.

Fingall arms courtesy of European Heraldry.    First published in April, 2012.

Friday, 14 September 2018

The Belmont Cataract

For the benefit of those of you who are unfamiliar with my ophthalmic history, it almost goes back to time immemorial, as those venerable peerages might say.

When I was a youth of about fifteen, suffering from a bout of ennui brought on by pop Thompson's maths class at Campbell, I suppose that was the time when the squinting commenced.

Thereafter I wore spectacles.

When I was about twenty years of age I purchased contact lenses, and wore those instead.

Fast forward to 1988, the year I made an appointment with that eminent Ulster eye surgeon, Mr Eric Cowan, whose consulting-rooms were in Eglantine Avenue, Belfast.

In a sense, Timothy was quite avant-garde in those days.

Mr Cowan pioneered the ophthalmic practice known as radial keratotomy, whereby minute incisions are made around the optic pupil in order to correct or improve myopia. 

I spent forty-eight hours in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, for this surgery.

It did improve the old eye-sight to the extent that I did not need to wear glasses.

My vision, however, deteriorated over time, and I decided to have laser surgery.

Let us Fast Forward again to 2017.

I was on holiday abroad in the bright sunshine one morning, at the swimming-pool of my hotel, when I became aware of a blemish of some sort in my right eye.

This blemish or spot is tricky to describe, so when I arrived home in Old Blighty I arranged for an appointment with the optician.

I was apprised that I had a cataract.

The optician wrote to my doctor, who arranged for me to see the relevant cataract clinic and, after many months, I was finally seen by the eye doctor.

I was informed that I had a cataract on my left eye as well, though I was unaware of this.

By this stage the cataract on my right eye was very blurry indeed.

I was reliant on my left eye for vision.

In April, 2018, I received a letter from the hospital letting me know that I was on a waiting-list for an appointment with them, though there was no mention of cataract surgery.

A few months later I was chatting my my aunt on the blower and she recounted her treatment with an eye surgeon based mainly in Belfast and Hillsborough, County Down.

Furthermore, when she heard of my predicament and the indefinite length of the waiting-list for cataract surgery, she urged me to get it done instanter, and highly recommended her consultant.

I called the clinic in Hillsborough, which happens to be directly beside the war memorial and parish church.

I was told that an appointment with Mr Rankin could be arranged within a fortnight, and that surgery could be about three weeks thereafter.

Well, dear readers, I considered it and called them back for an appointment.

Mr Rankin examined my eyes again and explained everything to me.

I decided to go ahead with surgery as soon as possible, so it took place on Wednesday this week at 3pm.

Service, care, treatment, staff were all second-to-none, as they say.

I didn't feel a thing apart from some stinging in the eye when the anaesthetic eye drops were introduced.

I'm writing this piece at almost 6pm, fifty-one hours later.

The sight in my right eye has been transformed and, as far as I'm concerned, it's virtually miraculous.

It's almost like having a new eye.

In fact, my right eye - the one which had a cataract - now has better, clearer, brighter vision than the "good" one.

I have an appointment with Mr Rankin in a few weeks time for a follow-up review, when I'll mention the other eye to him.

Wednesday, 5 September 2018

Princess Royal at Hillsborough


THE PRINCESS ROYAL this afternoon attended a Garden Party at Hillsborough Castle, County Down.

Her Royal Highness afterwards held a Reception in the garden of Hillsborough Castle for young people who have achieved the Gold Standard in The Duke of Edinburgh's Award.


Wednesday, 5th September: The Princess Royal, President, UK Fashion and Textile Association, this morning visited Mourne Textiles, Rostrevor, County Down, and was received by Mrs Fionnuala Cook OBE, (Vice Lord-Lieutenant of County Down).

Her Royal Highness, President, Royal Yachting Association, afterwards visited Portaferry Sailing Club, Portaferry, County Down, to mark its Fiftieth Anniversary, and opened Portaferry Recreation Hub, and was received by Mrs Amanda Brownlow DL.

The Princess Royal later opened Lakeland Dairies' new Packing Hall, 46 Belfast Road, Newtownards, County Down, and was received by Her Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant of County Down (Mr David Lindsay).

Her Royal Highness later opened the Northern Ireland Prison Service Memorial Garden, Hydebank Wood Secure College, County Down.

Saturday, 11 August 2018

New DL

APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY LIEUTENANT

Dr Angela Garvey, Lord-Lieutenant of the County Borough of Londonderry, has been pleased to appoint
Mr Zola Sipo MZIMBA MB ChB
Londonderry
County Londonderry
To be a Deputy Lieutenant of the County Borough, his Commission bearing date, the 1st day of August, 2018.

Dr Angela Garvey
Lord-Lieutenant of the County Borough

Friday, 27 July 2018

Guards Insignia


The cap badge of the Irish Guards and the bearskin plume are both based on the star and sky-blue sash colour of the Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick.

The Princess Royal is pictured presenting the Regiment with shamrock.

The badge consists of a star, within which is a shamrock with three crowns on its leaves (the historic kingdoms of England, Ireland and Scotland), the shamrock being placed on a cross of St Patrick.

The centre is surrounded by a circle which bears the legend QUIS SEPARABIT ~ who shall separate ~ and the Roman numerals MDCCLXXXIII ~1783 ~ the year that the Order of St Patrick was established.

First published in November, 2009.

Friday, 6 July 2018

Vice Lord-Lieutenant

APPOINTMENT OF VICE LORD-LIEUTENANT


Mrs Alison Millar, Lord-Lieutenant of County Londonderry, with the approval of Her Majesty The Queen, has been pleased to appoint

Mrs Stella BURNSIDE OBE DL
Londonderry
County Londonderry

To be Vice Lord-Lieutenant for the said County, her Commission bearing date the 28th day of June 2018.

Signed: Lord-Lieutenant of the County

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

KG Appointment


It was most gratifying to see the Viscount Brookeborough installed by Her Majesty The Queen as a Knight of the Garter at St George's Chapel, Windsor, on Monday, the 18th June, 2018.

Lord Brookeborough's grandfather, the 1st Viscount (the third Prime Minister of Northern Ireland), was himself appointed a Knight of the Garter in 1965.

In 1997, Her Majesty appointed Lord Brookeborough a Lord-in-Waiting.

He has been Lord-Lieutenant of County Fermanagh since 2012.

The family seat is Colebrooke Park, County Fermanagh.

The only other Knight of the Garter living in Northern Ireland is His Grace the Duke of Abercorn.

Monday, 18 June 2018

Gormanston Castle

THE VISCOUNTS GORMANSTON WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY MEATH, WITH 9,657 ACRES

The first member of this very ancient and distinguished family which is found upon record in Ireland is

PHILIP DE PRESTON, whose grandson,

ROGER DE PRESTON, was justice of the court of Common Pleas in the first year of EDWARD III; and in 1331, one of the justices of the Court of King's Bench.

The son and heir of this learned person, 

SIR ROBERT PRESTON, who was knighted in the field, in 1361, by Lionel, Duke of Clarence, and obtained a grant forever of the manor of Gormanston, in counties Dublin and Meath, was Lord Preston in Lancashire, and filled the office of LORD CHANCELLOR OF IRELAND.

Being possessed of Carbury in County Kildare, he made that the chief place of his residence.

This gentleman was elevated to the peerage some time between 1365-70 as Baron Gormanston.

His lordship married Margaret, daughter and heir of Walter de Bermingham, and dying in 1396, was succeeded by his only son,

CHRISTOPHER (c1354-1422), 2nd Baron, who was imprisoned in the castle of Trim for corresponding with the prior of Kilmainham.

He wedded Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of William de Londres, feudal baron of Naas in right of his mother, Emma, daughter of William FitzMaurice, 1st Baron of Naas (so created by HENRY II), and his wife, Helen, sister of Richard, Earl of Pembroke (by which marriage the Prestons obtained the barony of Naas).

His lordship was succeeded by his only son,

CHRISTOPHER, 3rd Baron, who espoused Jane, daughter of Sir Jenico d'Artois, Knight, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

ROBERT (1435-1503), 4th Baron, who was appointed deputy to Sir John Dynham, Lord Chancellor of Ireland; and Richard, Duke of York, youngest son of EDWARD IV, being constituted Lord Deputy of Ireland, in 1478, Sir Robert was appointed that prince's deputy (he being a minor), with power to elect a deputy to himself.

In 1478, his lordship was advanced to a viscountcy, by the title of VISCOUNT GORMANSTON.

His lordship sat in the parliament of 1490, and in that of 1493.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

WILLIAM, 2nd Viscount, who filled the office of deputy to Sir James Ormonde, Lord Treasurer of Ireland in 1493.

In 1504, his lordship attended the Earl of Kildare, the Lord Deputy, to the famous battle of Knocktough, in the province of Connaught, where, with Lord Killeen, he led the wings of the bowmen; and in 1525, he was appointed Lord Justice of Ireland.

His lordship died in 1532, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

JENICO, 3rd Viscount (1502-69), who was succeeded by his eldest son,

CHRISTOPHER, 4th Viscount (1546-99), who left, with several daughters, three sons, namely,
JENICO, his heir;
Thomas, created Viscount Tara;
William.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

JENICO, 5th Viscount (1584-1630), who left (with a daughter) a son and successor,

NICHOLAS, 6th Viscount (1608-43), who wedded Mary, daughter of Nicholas, 1st Viscount Kingsland, and had issue,
JENICO, his successor;
Nicholas, father of 8th and 9th Viscounts.
This nobleman sided with the rebel Irish Roman Catholics, 1641-42, and acted as their General-in-Chief; for this he was outlawed after his death and posthumously exempted from Cromwell's pardon, 1652.

He was succeeded by his eldest son,

JENICO, 7th Viscount, who having adhered to his legitimate sovereign, JAMES II, was indicted for high treason, and outlawed upon that indictment in 1691.

His lordship dying, however, in 1691, without male issue, was succeeded by his nephew,

JENICO, de jure 8th Viscount (1640-1700); but the title was not acknowledged, although borne by his lordship and his three immediate successors.

He was succeeded by his brother,

ANTHONY, de jure 9th Viscount, who espoused, in 1700, Mary, only child of his uncle, Jenico, 7th Viscount, and was succeeded by his only son,

JENICO, de jure 10th Viscount (1707-57), who wedded, in 1729, Thomasine, eldest daughter of John, 11th Baron Trimlestown, and had, with other issue,
ANTHONY, his successor;
James;
Jenico;
John;
Catherine; Frances; Bridget; Elizabeth Margaret.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

ANTHONY, de jure 11th Viscount, who espoused Henrietta, daughter of John Robinson, of Denston Hall, Suffolk; and dying in 1786, left issue by her,

JENICO, 12th Viscount (1775-1860), who, in 1800, obtained the removal of the outlawry of his predecessors and had a writ of summons to take his seat in the Irish House of Lords, but owing to the final prorogation of that House he did not have the opportunity to do so, took an active part in the cause of Catholic Emancipation.

His lordship wedded, in 1794, Margaret, eldest daughter of Thomas, 2nd Viscount Southwell, by whom he had issue,
EDWARD ANTHONY JOHN, his successor;
Arthur Anthony;
Jenico Charles;
Robert;
Charles;
Edmund;
Matilda.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

EDWARD ANTHONY JOHN, 13th Viscount (1796-1876), High Sheriff of County Meath, 1831, High Sheriff of County Dublin, 1845, who married, in 1836, Lucretia, daughter of William Charles Jerningham, and had issue,
JENICO WILLIAM JOSEPH, his successor;
Edward Francis John;
Margaret Frances Agnes; Lucretia Pauline Mary; Charlotte Agnes Mary.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

JENICO WILLIAM JOSEPH, 14th Viscount (1837-1907), GCMG JP DL, High Sheriff of County Dublin, 1865, who espoused firstly, in 1861, Ismay Louise Ursula, daughter of Patrick, 1st Baron Bellew, though the marriage was without issue.

He married secondly, in 1878, Georgina Jane, daughter of Peter Connelan, and had issue,
JENICO EDWARD JOSEPH, his successor;
Richard Martin Peter;
Hubert Anthony John;
Ismay Lucretia Mary.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

JENICO EDWARD JOSEPH, 15th Viscount (1879-1925), JP DL, who wedded, in 1911, Eileen, daughter of Lieutenant-General the Rt Hon Sir William Butler, of Bansha Castle, County Tipperary, and had issue,
JENICO WILLIAM RICHARD, his successor;
Robert Francis Hubert;
Stephen Edward Thomas;
Eileen Antionette Mary.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

JENICO WILLIAM RICHARD, 16th Viscount (1914-40), 2nd Lieutenant, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, who espoused, in 1939, Pamela, daughter of Captain Edward Dudley Hanly, and had issue, an only child,
JENICO NICHOLAS DUDLEY, his successor.
His lordship was killed in action, aged 25, in France.

He was succeeded by his only son,

JENICO NICHOLAS DUDLEY, 17th Viscount (1939-), who is married with issue and lives in London.

The Viscounts Gormanston are the premier viscounts of Ireland.


GORMANSTON CASTLE, Balbriggan, County Meath, is situated near Drogheda, about sixteen miles north of Dublin.

Mark Bence-Jones states that the old Manor at Gormanston was low and gabled, adjoined to a chapel where Mass was said all through the Penal times.

At the beginning of the 19th century, the 12th Viscount rebuilt the house in the Gothic-Revival style.


Gormanston Castle is an impressive castellated building with a quadrangular plan with a tower at each corner except the north-west corner. The main building is three storeys.

The central part of the frontage is flanked by two narrow castellated towers on either side of the entrance.

The 12th Viscount intended the Castle to be much larger, though building work ceased when his wife died in 1820.

Gormanston is renowned for the foxes which are said to collect at the Castle when the head of the family is dying or has died; indeed the family crest is a fox.

Foxes are claimed to have gathered followed the deaths of the 12th and 14th Viscounts.


The author Evelyn Waugh was interested in purchasing the estate in 1946 and even bid for it.

He described it as "A fine, solid, grim, square, half-finished block with tower and turrets".

On learning that Butlins were opening a holiday camp in the vicinity, he promptly changed his mind.

The castle grounds were developed in the 1950s with the building of a boys' secondary school adjacent to the Castle.

The Franciscans have been in Gormanston since 1947, when they purchased Gormanston Castle, the ancestral home of the Preston Family since ca 1300.

In 1954 a Preparatory School for the College in Multyfarnham was opened in the Castle.

New plans resulted in the building of a new college and the transfer of the Multyfarnham College to this new location.

Gormanston College today is a thriving secondary school, with 500 students.

Gormanston arms courtesy of European Heraldry.   First published in January, 2012.